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Posts Tagged ‘Anglo-French’


Boomerang
Michael Lewis| Allen Lane| 213 pp, Rs 599

In Boomerang, American writer and journalist, Michael Lewis travels to – Iceland, Greece, Ireland and Germany to understand what caused the European financial crises and comes up with some startling observations. In his telling of the story, the Icelanders are alpha male risk takers, Greeks corrupt and mistrustful, the Irish overzealous and the Germans double faced. And all that adds up to current Euro fiasco. According to Lewis, Iceland turned itself into a banking hub by recycling world’s money – taking short-term loans from foreign entities and relending it to themselves to buy assets – like Indian power plants or Danish newspapers – creating false prosperity and living off money they did not own. In Greece the banks did not sink the country, it was the mammoth money guzzling government infrastructure that sank the banks. The Irish borrowed money from foreign banks and invested it in Ireland pledging to pay back what they couldn’t.

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The Unlucky Lottery
Hakan Nesser| Mantle, Pan Macmillan| 437 pp, £ 12.99

This is the sixth book in the Van Veeteren series penned by one of Sweden’s most popular crime writers, Haken Nasser. First published in 1998 as Munster’s Fall, this book retires Veeteren and introduces a new detective, Inspector Munster. The action takes place in Maardam, a fictitious small coastal town in Sweden. In it four Swedish pensioners find out one day that they have won 20,000 kroner in a lottery. They gather to celebrate. Soon afterwards one is stabbed to death with a carving knife and another disappears. To unravel the mystery, Inspector Munster, must interact with a psychotic family that hides a hideous secret. Is it all make believe or did it really happen? It’s a Scandinavian roller coaster and with enough loops and twists to keep you between the pages.

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The Lady of the Rivers
Philippa Gregory| Simon & Schuster| 502 pp, Rs 499

This one is for the teenage history buffs. The Lady of the Rivers tells the story of Jacquetta Woodvile and her daughter, Elizabeth who ended up marrying England’s king, Edward IV in a secret ceremony. Jacquetta married the Duke of Bradford, an ambitious man thrice her age and shortly lived as the first lady of English ruled France. Her second marriage was to Sir Richard Woodvile. During this time, she served Margeret of Anjou through the ‘War of the Roses’, a particularly turbulent period in the Anglo-French relations. Phillippa Gregory reconstructs the events of the 15th century to weave an intriguing tale of life, love and survival. It’s a mystery, she says, why Jacquetta has been ignored by historians, when she appears to have played an important and sometimes decisive role in the events that shaped Anglo-French affairs in the middle ages.

(An edited version of the above reviews appeared in the Sunday edition of the Mail Today, New Delhi, dated 30 October 2011)

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