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Posts Tagged ‘Greece civil war’


Black Bread White Beer
Niven Govinden | Fourth Estate, Harper Collins | Rs 350

Hanif Khureshi told the story of his generation. Govinden hits on his. In My Beautiful Launderette written in 1985 Khureshi tackled race in a tactful and humorous way. Years down the line Govinden sees no humour. In Black Bread White Beer, his loathing and empathy for the other is almost Roth-like in its embrace “… lippy girls who told him he never did anything right, until he got out his credit card”. An unnerving novel that deserves to be read by anyone interested in race relations in modern day England, told from a perspective of a second generation Indian who is, to put it simply, rabidly honest.

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The Thread
Victoria Hislop | Headline Review | Rs 350

Set against the backdrop of the Mediterranean, The Thread, tells the story of three generations of an orthodox Greek family settled in Thessaloniki after the break out of the Greek civil war in the 1940s. Thessaloniki, says the writer, was a city where “an even mixture of Christians, Jews and Muslims lived”. Three decades later there were only Christians. There is more. Through the decades of upheaval the city served as a concentration camp where the Communists and other radicals were jailed and tortured. This is their story. Her first book, The Island, created ripples both in England and Greece in 2005.

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The Accused
John Grisham | Hodder | Rs 250

Anyone expecting a typical Grisham legal thriller is in for a shock. This is not it. The Accused – a part of the Theodore Boone series – tells a story of a teenager who’s accused of a crime he does not commit. The blurb on the flap bills him as a boy who ‘who knows more than most adult lawyers’. Exciting you could say, particularly for young adults brought up on Harry Potter.  Only there is no death- defying thrill of adventure here, only lessons in law. So if you are looking for a true-blue Grisham fix, wait till fall when his adult thriller The Confession hits the stores.

(An edited version of the above reviews appeared in the Sunday edition of Mail Today, New Delhi, dated 10 June 2012)

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