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Posts Tagged ‘short stories’


Colours Of The Cage
Arun Ferreira | Aleph | Rs 295

Screen Shot 2015-01-11 at 7.40.30 PMIn May 2007 human rights activist from Bandra, Arun Ferreira, was arrested by the Nagpur Police. He was charged with criminal conspiracy, murder, possession of arms and rioting. He was branded a Maoist. It took him four years and eight months to prove the State wrong. Ferreira was held in the notorious Nagpur jail – which he describes in this book in great detail. He speaks of the corruption, torture, code of conduct between prison mates, the general air of helplessness and the small things that keep hope alive. A chilling story, simply told.

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Fewer, Bigger, Bolder
Sanjay Khosla & Mohanbir Sawhney | Penguin | Rs 699

Screen Shot 2015-01-11 at 7.40.46 PMSanjay Khosla is a former president of Kraft Foods and Mahanbir Sawhney is a consultant in business innovation. Both currently work at Kellog School of Management. The flap mentions a third person, a longtime editor of ‘Chicago’ magazine, Richard Babock as a writer and teacher in Chicago – who we suspect is the actual writer of this tome. The book comes with a foreword by former chairman and CEO, Kraft Foods, Irene Rosenfeld who reveals that Khosla helped the company sell ‘Oreo’ cookie outside US. This book, she hopes, will be a ‘classic’ like ‘Oreo’.

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Turning Point
Ed. by Nikita Singh | Offshoots | Rs 399

Screen Shot 2015-01-11 at 7.41.01 PM‘Turning Point’ presents 8 short stories by young Indian writers that includes a vampire going through an identity crisis, a ghost stuck in the world of the living, a closet psychopath, a boy in love and a crime buster in Ahmedabad. The writers include Meenakshi Reddy Madhavan, Durjoy Dutta, Judy Balan, Harsh Snehanshu, Shoma Narayanan, Parinda Joshi, Atulya Mahajan and the editor of the anthology, Nikita Singh. “Every story,” says Singh, “starts or ends at a turning point. Or maybe revolves around one. Things change – that’s one truth of life.” Where have we heard this before?

(The above reviews appeared in Sunday edition of the Mail Today, New Delhi, dated 16 November 2014.)

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Tales From The Secret Annexe
Anne Frank | Hatchette India | Rs 350

“I can’t imagine having to live like…all the woman who go about their work and are then forgotten. I need to have something besides a husband and children to devote myself to! I don’t want to have lived in vain like most people,” wrote Anne Frank on the margins of her diary. The teenager’s angst now finds a new outlet in a collection of short stories, fables, reminisces and an unfinished novel, “Cady’s Life” – that were not included in the original dairy that was first published in 1947. In these writings, Anne emerges as a perceptive, often edgy, witty and compassionate writer.

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Flame: The Story of My Mother Shahnaz Husain
Nelofar Currimbhoy | Hatchette India | Rs 295

In this hagiography to her mother, a daughter recounts the journey of Shahnaz Husain, the name synonymous today with the beauty saloon that she started in 1970s and the cosmetic company that she launched in early-1990s. When she started, “There was not a single product at the time in the Indian market that was geared towards serious skin care,” complains Nelofar. Shahnaz would have to convince a generation of women to give up their fascination for foreign cosmetics and give Ayurvedic products a try. And for a while she succeeded, till a scandal that revealed that that her products were not purely Ayurvedic – took the sheen off.

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The Terrorist
Juggi Bhasin | Penguin Metro Reads| Rs 250

“India may or may not be a land of a million mutinies but for a decade it has been pounded by a rash of insurgencies and terrorist acts, many rising from within and still more directed from outside its shores,” writes Bhasin.  This is his first thriller. In it, he explores the complex process of human emotions and individual or organisational training that goes into making of a terrorist and a commando. Both are trained to kill and both exude high motivation. The only thing that separates them is a ‘junoon’.  But what if that was not true? Bhasin gives us a bite.

(An edited version of the above reviews appeared in the Sunday edition of the Mail Today, New Delhi, dated 13 May 2012)

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